What are the Different Types of Construction Industry Jobs?

Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari
Construction managers are typically responsible for managing both skilled and unskilled laborers on a project.
Construction managers are typically responsible for managing both skilled and unskilled laborers on a project.

Construction industry jobs range from unskilled laborers to specially trained managers and specialists. The pay scale for construction industry jobs will vary according to the job, its qualifications, and other common factors associated with pay raises and salary negotiations. Unskilled labor positions are perhaps the most common construction industry jobs, and such jobs do not require a candidate to have a specific level of education or any specialized training. Carpenters, masons, and managers very often need specialty training or higher levels of education, and the pay for such positions is usually much better.

An unskilled laborer will work on a variety of projects and perform many different tasks according to the specific job. As one of the most basic construction industry jobs, an unskilled laborer is likely to dig ditches, break up concrete or asphalt, lay down new asphalt, clear brush and trees, install barriers, and so on. The pay for such a job is generally fairly low, and candidates do not need to have obtained a specific level of education. An unskilled laborer can work his way up to the next pay level by obtaining specialty certifications, such as heavy machinery operator or commercial driver. Obtaining such certifications can help an unskilled laborer obtain better construction industry jobs and place him in a higher pay bracket.

Construction managers and team leaders often have college degrees and are responsible for managing both unskilled and skilled laborers on a project. Managers may also perform other specialized construction industry jobs, such as estimating, in which he or she will assess a potential project and prepare a bid accordingly. This job requires extensive knowledge of construction processes as well as a keen interest in current trends and pricing. Managers may also work onsite directly managing all laborers, and they will be responsible for obtaining all necessary raw materials, permits, permissions, and so on.

Skilled laborers include any laborers with specific skills. A mason, for example, is a laborer who is particularly knowledgeable in laying bricks. This task is difficult and requires patience and experience, so skilled laborers often get paid more than unskilled laborers to do the job onsite. Roofers and carpenters are other examples of skilled laborers. Some of these jobs require some level of education, but others require only that the laborer has plenty of experience and has developed significant skills in that area. Skilled laborers sometimes work on jobs as independent contractors rather than laborers hired to a construction company.

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    • Construction managers are typically responsible for managing both skilled and unskilled laborers on a project.
      Construction managers are typically responsible for managing both skilled and unskilled laborers on a project.