How Do I Become a Career Development Manager?

Geri Terzo
Geri Terzo
Woman with hand on her hip
Woman with hand on her hip

Employee retention within an organization has financial benefits, and it promotes a positive corporate culture. Increasingly, the task of keeping employees focused on growth has become blurred as personnel in the human resources divisions become focused on other, more seemingly pressing and immediate concerns. Some companies, however, devote entire programs to not only retaining employees but helping those individuals to excel. To become a career development manager, you should take on a role on a career development team or in human resources and demonstrate an ability to run that corporate division.

Earning an education is essential on the path to become a career development manager. A bachelor's degree from a college or university should suffice, and any postgraduate degree in management or human resources would certainly enhance your credentials. Sales and marketing experience could also prepare someone to become a career development manager as this role requires interpersonal skills that will attract talent and appeal to employers and top management executives. If there are any management training courses available at the corporation for which you work, taking advantage of these benefits could propel your career. Other than that, accepting appropriate and related job titles and projects in the career development arena can lead you to your desired role.

Seek employment at an organization with a career development team either for the local office or on an international scale. Serving as a team member for a period of time will teach you some of the logistical and communication skills that are required to become a career development manager. Technology companies might be among the industries that remain devoted to inspiring and maintaining staff because talent in this field is highly specialized. Consider working for a company that promotes innovation from all the staff and that rewards talented employees with career advancement. Companies that offer incentives for contributing ideas to management are likely to encourage individual career growth and development.

To become a career development manager, consider working for a college or university with a career placement program. An individual in this position may be responsible for seeking employment opportunities for students and graduates. Employers might seek out an individual with career experience in human resources or the recruiting industry. A university program would likely require that you develop business relationships within the community but also be willing to travel to uncover opportunities for students. Subsequently, relationship-building skills are important for someone who wants to become a career development manager.

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      Woman with hand on her hip