What Should I do After a Vasectomy Reversal?

Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum

A vasectomy reversal is a type of procedure that is performed on the male reproductive system to allow the male to be capable of siring children once again. As with any type of medical procedure, there is a period of recovery that may include some degree of discomfort. Fortunately, it is possible to manage recovery after a vasectomy reversal with relative ease by utilizing pain medication in the manner prescribed by the attending medical professional, observe certain limitations in physical activity for a specified period of time, and reporting immediately the occurrence of several different complications, including continued bleeding from the incision, the development of a lump in the scrotum, or extreme difficulty in urinating.

Physical activity should be avoided for a short time after a vasectomy reversal.
Physical activity should be avoided for a short time after a vasectomy reversal.

The actual process of a vasectomy reversal reconnects the tubes that were severed and sealed when the initial vasectomy was performed. By reconnecting those severed ends, sperm from the testicles is once again contained in the ejaculate or semen of the male, making it possible to father a child. Just as there is the possibility for some pain and swelling in the male genitalia as the result of a vasectomy, some amount of swelling and pain can reasonably be expected after a vasectomy reversal is performed.

For many men, the level of discomfort experienced after a vasectomy reversal is somewhat minor and will subside in a short period of time. Some doctors may recommend that for light swelling and inflammation, patients use over the counter pain relievers along with the application of some type of cold compress to aid the recovery process. At other times, pain medication may be prescribed to help the patient function and sleep well during the recovery phase.

Physical activity is often curtailed for a short period of time after a vasectomy reversal. While patients are generally free to walk and sit with relatively few restrictions, engaging in rigorous physical activity such as playing sports may be restricted for several days, allowing the swelling to subside and the healing to complete. Typically, physical intimacy involving intercourse should be avoided until a follow-up examination by the attending physician takes place, and the physician is sure that the reconnected tissue is holding and melding properly.

During the recovery period after a vasectomy reversal, the patient should be alert to any signs that complications have developed. This includes fever sustained over more than a day or so, swelling in the scrotum that is not subsiding within the time frame suggested by the physician, the development of lumps or masses within the scrotum, or problems with urination in general. In most cases, the complications may be signs of an infection that can be taken care of with antibiotics, allowing the recovery to continue. At other times, the complications may be indications of a more severe situation, requiring an additional procedure to correct the issues.

Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum

After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including wiseGEEK, and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers. Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling.

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