We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How We Make Money

We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently from our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is Tree Pollen?

Marjorie McAtee
By
Updated May 17, 2024
Our promise to you
WiseGeek is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At WiseGeek, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Pollen grains are a fine dust that plants typically release in spring. They carry the plant's male DNA from the stamen, or male part of the plant, to the pistil, or female part of the plant, in the process known as pollination. Pollination makes fertilization and reproduction possible in plants. Tree pollen is simply the pollen produced by trees. It is a common allergen, though there are only about 100 species of trees that cause reactions in those who suffer from tree pollen allergies. Tree pollen allergies account for about 20% of hay fever symptoms as well.

Trees commonly responsible for hay fever symptoms include birch, redwood, hazel, elm, oak and pine trees. Tree pollen season typically begins early in the spring, since trees normally release their pollen earlier than grass and weeds. In temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, tree pollen season typically begins in February or March and continues until about May. In the Southern Hemisphere, the season typically begins in September and ends in February. Some species, such as pine trees, continue to produce pollen into the summer months. The pollen from such trees is usually heavier than the pollen produced by other species, however, so it tends to fall quickly to the ground without eliciting a strong allergic reaction in hay fever sufferers.

Hay fever sufferers typically use a multi-pronged strategy to control their symptoms during allergy season. Over-the-counter and prescription medications, such as xylometazoline, steroids and antihistamines, can manage hay fever symptoms. Preventative measures can help protect hay fever sufferers from excessive exposure to allergens during the tree pollen season as well.

Hay fever sufferers should know what time of the year they're most likely to suffer from allergy symptoms; during this time, they should monitor the pollen count, which is a daily measurement of the number of pollen grains present in one cubic foot of air. Hay fever sufferers should remain indoors on days when the pollen count is high, especially between the hours of 5 A.M. and 10 A.M., when concentrations of pollen in the air tend to be the highest. Hay fever sufferers may be advised to keep doors and windows closed in their homes and cars to keep pollen out. They may also want to dry their clothes in a tumble dryer, since pollen can collect on clothes hung out to dry. It also may be smart to keep in mind that pets and people can contaminate the indoor environment by carrying pollen in on clothes and shoes.

WiseGeek is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Marjorie McAtee
By Marjorie McAtee , Former Writer
Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.

Discussion Comments

By anon337463 — On Jun 05, 2013

Allergies are from chemtrails. Stop taking meds, making corporate shareholders happy. It's a scam, allergies.

I realized that every day, on the radio "Grass pollen, Ragweed are high today". How do they know? Ask yourself.

Because they are spraying us with chemtrials, softly killing us. Look at the side effects of the allergy meds. Is it how you feel? I stopped taking all meds. Side effects are what you are still feeling.

By mandydances — On Apr 30, 2011

@liveoak- I am allergic to pollen too. Not only do trees bother me, but flowers do too. I also cannot go outside on days the pollen count is high. I hate having allergies.

By liveoak — On Apr 28, 2011

I have allergies. Every day I watch the news to see what the tree pollen count will be. On the days it is high, I am absolutely miserable. On those days, I try to stay inside as much as possible. I take medication, but none of it makes me 100% comfortable.

Marjorie McAtee

Marjorie McAtee

Former Writer

Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.
WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.