What is Aristocort®?

A. Delgado
A. Delgado
Withdrawal from Aristocort may cause loss of appetite.
Withdrawal from Aristocort may cause loss of appetite.

Aristocort® is an oral medication used as a treatment for arthritis, adrenal disorders, asthma, certain cancers and severe allergies. It contains a corticosteroid called triamcinolone and is available as a tablet or syrup. The medication works by imitating and replacing hormones that the adrenal glands have trouble producing. The drawbacks of taking Aristocort® include lowered immune system functioning and unpleasant symptoms when usage is abruptly stopped.

Parents should discuss risks of Aristocort with their child's pediatrician.
Parents should discuss risks of Aristocort with their child's pediatrician.

Doctors use Aristocort® for a variety of conditions. It relieves inflammation throughout the body, which helps alleviate symptoms of arthritis, intestinal disorders, thyroid disease, severe allergies and kidney disorders. It may also be prescribed to treat adrenal disorders, some types of cancer, asthma, blood diseases and skin disorders.

Patients need to follow the dosage and directions given by their doctor, which will vary depending on the condition being treated. Aristocort® is generally taken with food or milk to reduce the chance of an upset stomach, and patients can determine if the tablet or syrup form is more easily digestible. Doctors advise patients to take the full dosage of Aristocort® as directed, even if symptoms begin to improve. Corticosteroids can cause a number of withdrawal symptoms when patients suddenly stop taking them, including nausea, headaches, appetite loss, vomiting, confusion, fever, joint or muscle pain and drowsiness. The dosage of Aristocort® will be gradually stepped-down as a patient's condition improves, decreasing the patient's chances of experiencing these medical problems.

Regular or long-term use of Aristocort® can compromise the immune system temporarily, making patients more susceptible to illness and infection. Doctors warn patients not to get live vaccines and to avoid contact with people who have contagious illnesses while taking Aristocort®. Patients should notify their doctor right away if they experience symptoms of illness or infection such as a fever.

Aristocort® can interfere with other types of medication. Patients need to tell their doctor if they're taking aspirin, blood thinners, diuretics, birth control or medications for arthritis. Diabetic patients need to let their doctor know about their condition since this medication can affect blood sugar levels. Other conditions of concern include allergies to triamcinolone, pregnancy, breastfeeding, ulcers, fungal infections, underactive thyroid and liver or kidney disease. Parents should discuss the risks of Aristocort® in kids with their pediatrician because it can impair the growth of bones in young children.

Mild side effects of Aristocort® include acne, anxiety, headaches, nausea, restlessness, bruising easily and depression. Serious side effects include facial swelling, prolonged colds, weak muscles, rashes, vision problems and dark and tarry stools. Patients should get medical help immediately if they have any of these symptoms or if mild side effects become worse.

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Discussion Comments

anon266788

Has aristocort been pulled from the market for the treatment of asthma?

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    • Withdrawal from Aristocort may cause loss of appetite.
      By: mbt_studio
      Withdrawal from Aristocort may cause loss of appetite.
    • Parents should discuss risks of Aristocort with their child's pediatrician.
      By: nyul
      Parents should discuss risks of Aristocort with their child's pediatrician.