What Factors Affect Nursing Turnover?

Nicole Madison
Nicole Madison
Nicole Madison
Nicole Madison
The stress associated with being a nurse could negatively affect turnover.
The stress associated with being a nurse could negatively affect turnover.

There are many factors that can affect nursing turnover rates. Among them are pay rates and job satisfaction, as a nurse who is well paid and happy in her job may be more likely to remain in her position. The benefits nurses receive may prove influential as well. Interestingly, nurse shortages can also affect nursing turnover rates, as they can lead to more patients for each nurse and a more stressful work life overall, which in turn serves to increase the turnover rate. The availability of other nursing jobs may also play a role in the rate at which nurses leave their jobs.

One of the primary factors that affect nursing turnover rates is salary. Nurses who receive higher pay may prove less likely to leave their jobs for other positions. Likewise, nurses who receive attractive benefits packages may be more likely to remain in their current positions as well. For example, a nurse with an excellent medical, dental, vacation, and retirement benefit package may prove more reluctant to change jobs than a nurse with a less attractive package.

Job satisfaction is another factor that can affect nursing turnover rates. When a nurse feels satisfied with her position and appreciated for her work, she may feel less tempted to leave her job. Likewise, if a nurse feels good about the quality of care she and her fellow medical staff members provide, she may be more likely to remain in her current position. Stress that is caused by such things as work environment politics, however, may increase the likelihood that a nurse will leave her job.

Nursing shortages are also among the common issues that may cause a nurse to consider leaving her job. Nursing shortages put a lot of pressure on nurses who are currently working. They may be required to take on more patients at one time or agree to less desirable scheduling. This pressure often causes the life of a nurse to become overly stressful and may lead her to quit her job.

Sometimes the availability of nursing jobs in the area is also an important factor in nursing turnover rates. If a nurse is aware that comparable jobs in her area are scarce, she may prove more eager to hold onto hers. If, on the other hand, she knows there are many good job opportunities in her area, she may feel less concerned about keeping her current position.

Nicole Madison
Nicole Madison

Nicole’s thirst for knowledge inspired her to become a wiseGEEK writer, and she focuses primarily on topics such as homeschooling, parenting, health, science, and business. When not writing or spending time with her four children, Nicole enjoys reading, camping, and going to the beach.

Nicole Madison
Nicole Madison

Nicole’s thirst for knowledge inspired her to become a wiseGEEK writer, and she focuses primarily on topics such as homeschooling, parenting, health, science, and business. When not writing or spending time with her four children, Nicole enjoys reading, camping, and going to the beach.

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    • The stress associated with being a nurse could negatively affect turnover.
      The stress associated with being a nurse could negatively affect turnover.