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How Has the Population of Those Aged 65+ Changed over Time?

The population of those aged 65 and older is rapidly increasing. The United Nations estimates that by 2100, more than 23 percent of the people in the world will be 65 or older, up from 7.6 percent in 2010. By 2050, the population of those aged 60 or older will, for the first time, be equal to the population of those 15 or younger.

More facts about population:

  • The proportion of children is expected to decrease as the aging population increases. By 2050, it's expected that about 15 percent of the population will be 15 or younger, down from about 35 percent in 1950.

  • The dependency ratio in developed countries — that is, the percentage of older people depending on younger people for care — is expected to surpass 50 percent for the first time before the year 2025. By 2025, about 40 percent of the population in developed countries will have to care for the other 60 percent. Globally, the number of working-age people per older person is projected to drop by 50 percent by 2060.

  • Older Americans spend about 13 percent of their income on healthcare, more than double that of the younger population. More than 90 percent of those 65 or older in the United States rely on the government for their medical care.
Discussion Comments
By anon203101 — On Aug 04, 2011

Yeah, it's great going on. We have to be cured from diseases and the average age is increasing.

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