How Do I Become an Insurance Verifier?

Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

The requirements to become an insurance verifier may include a high school diploma and some vocational training or experience in medical offices. Employers set their own standards, and it may helpful to review job listings to get an idea of what kinds of qualifications are expected in a given region. Insurance verifiers typically work in medical clinics, hospitals, and similar facilities to determine the level of insurance coverage patients have, and to find out what is covered under their policies. Good communication skills are necessary for work in this field, as insurance verifiers talk with patients, care providers, and insurance representatives to coordinate care and payment.

Man with hands on his hips
Man with hands on his hips

For a basic insurance verifier job, an employer may accept a trainee with a high school diploma who demonstrates a willingness to learn and the ability to fit into an office environment. These entry-level positions provide some job training under supervision to allow personnel to learn about how medical offices work. As the employee gains more experience, more complex work assignments can be given. This may eventually result in enough experience to apply for open positions and become an insurance verifier.

Another way to become an insurance verifier is to take a course at a trade or vocational school. Courses designed for medical secretaries are available, along with medical billing and coding coursework. It can be useful to have experience with medical coding, as this can be an important aspect of determining insurance eligibility for procedures and treatments. This educational experience can allow people to apply directly for insurance verifier jobs, rather than having to work their way up through the ranks of a medical office.

In addition to having experience or education in the field, someone who plans to become an insurance verifier may also need to be willing to pass a background check. Medical offices work with sensitive information and materials, and may want to confirm that an employee can adhere to privacy guidelines and will not misuse the information. It is important to have references who can provide good character assessments. Experience in other sensitive environments, or a certificate indicating that a job candidate has passed a confidentiality training course, can be helpful.

Once someone has become an insurance verifier, it is important to keep up with the industry. Insurance companies periodically make policy changes, including changes to the procedures covered with their standard policies. Insurance verifiers need to know what kinds of services are provided with different types of insurance plans and must be able to clearly communicate this information to patients and care providers.

Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a wiseGEEK researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

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