How Do I Become a Property Claims Adjuster?

Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis
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Woman posing

A person who wants to become a property claims adjuster may have to go through considerable training and preparation in order to land a job in the industry. In addition to basic educational requirements, the qualifications typically include a work history compatible with the duties of the job. In some regions, certification through training and testing is required or encouraged for any insurance worker who wishes to become a property claims adjuster. Aspiring claims adjusters may also need to decide whether to search for a job with an insurance company, or set up a freelance business as an independent professional.

There are no official educational degrees required to become a property claims adjuster. Some employers prefer to hire workers with a college degree in business, mathematics, or other related fields. Other companies may be happy to provide on the job training for talented or agreeable candidates, and may ask only for basic educational requirements, such as a high school diploma.

Work history can be an important factor in finding a job as a claims adjuster. Getting an entry level job in the property insurance business can be a good way to learn about the industry, make professional contacts, and have the inside word on upcoming job opportunities within the claims department. Employers may be pleased to learn that a new hire has an interest in becoming a claims adjuster, and may be willing to provide training and internships to help an entry level worker develop into a qualified adjuster.

In many regions, licensing or certification is required for all insurance claims adjusters. A local department of insurance or business bureau may be a good resource for determining what licensing requirements, if any, exist for the region. Certification typically requires self-directed study followed by passing a written test on insurance laws and regulations, but some areas may also require professionals to meet certain training requirements. Adjusters who work for an insurance company may be able to get employer compensation for licensing fees and required training, while independent professionals typically pay these expenses on their own.

Property claims adjusters are often squarely in the middle of debates between claimants and insurance companies; it is important for any person who wishes to become a property claims adjuster to determine which side of the fight he or she prefers. Independent adjusters, who are typically freelance professionals, are often hired by claimants to assess damages from a purely objective viewpoint. Industry adjusters work for the insurance companies, and may have to reconcile claims with company policy.

Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis

With a B.A. in theater from UCLA and a graduate degree in screenwriting from the American Film Institute, Jessica is passionate about drama and film. She has many other interests, and enjoys learning and writing about a wide range of topics in her role as a writer.

Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis

With a B.A. in theater from UCLA and a graduate degree in screenwriting from the American Film Institute, Jessica is passionate about drama and film. She has many other interests, and enjoys learning and writing about a wide range of topics in her role as a writer.

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