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How Often Should I Have Vision Screening?

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  • Written By: wiseGEEK Writer
  • Edited By: O. Wallace
  • Last Modified Date: 18 December 2017
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A vision screening is not the same thing as an eye exam. It’s usually a much shorter test that may be performed by many different people including general practice doctors, pediatricians or school nurses. Usually, what this exam does is indicate whether a person needs further tests to rule out certain eye conditions, and whether it would be important for a person to get an eye exam. Most people can remember having a vision screening or two. They’re commonly done at places like schools or at motor vehicle departments when driver’s licenses are issued or renewed.

There can be specific guidelines for getting a vision screening that depend upon age. For children, the following ages can be appropriate to obtain a screening. These are sometime between the ages of 0-2, and once between age 3-5. More general recommendations are that children should have a vision screening every time they have a well child visit at the doctor’s, and the first one should occur at birth. Thereafter, when kids visit the doctor for the average check up they should have one done.

Schools may also perform these screenings every couple of years with primary school children. These are usually in accordance with recommendations from pediatric and ophthalmology or optometry organizations and may vary. More frequent screenings may be required in schools when children suffer from learning disabilities.

Adults between the ages of 19-40 should generally have a vision screening every one to two years. However, organizations like the American Optometric Association recommend that people not have a screening but instead have an eye exam every two years. Moreover, they suggest that people contact an eye doctor if they have any troubles with vision in between exams or screenings.

The same organization argues that vision screenings are not especially useful after people are in their 40s, and they really should have eye exams every two years from ages 40-61. After 61 recommendations include yearly eye exams. People who have not had any trouble with vision are still at risk for developing age related conditions and could benefit from both vision screenings and eye exams on a frequent basis. However, eye exams are superior to a vision screening in catching problems or diseases that can affect the eyes.

Vision screenings and eye exams may be needed more frequently if eye problems already exist. A person with glaucoma would probably skip screenings and might see an optometrist or ophthalmologist on a very regular basis. Usually, vision screening recommendations exist for those who have thus far not exhibited potential vision issues. Following an eye doctor’s guidelines on when to make appointments if a person has vision problems is safer than following general screening guidelines for the total population.

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BambooForest
Post 2

@hyrax53, I used to do that myself when I was little. I also had trouble when I was five and I had my first eye exam at a doctor using more advanced vision screening equipment. My first pair of glasses gave me a terrible headache. Of course, this headache meant that I refused to wear my glasses, and everyone though it was because I thought glasses were stupid, and it wasn't until I was almost nine years old than I finally got a new pair. The thing about really small children is that it's hard for them to understand what's happening at a vision screening or eye exam, especially if their vision is already significantly bad.

hyrax53
Post 1

As a child, I had vision screening tests once a year in elementary school. The problem I remember, however, is that many vision screening charts are identical. That means that during a vision screening, children might just say what they think the chart is when they're asked to switch eyes or walk further or closer to the chart.

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