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Why Is Money Green in the United States?

Money is green in the United States, it is believed, because that color of ink was the most readily available when the paper currency design was introduced in 1929. Prior to then, paper currency mainly used black ink with colored elements, but counterfeiters were able to recreate the colored portions too easily. Another possible reason green ink was chosen was because it is more able to withstand heat and chemical exposure without changing appearance. Green ink might also have been chosen for US money because the color green was viewed as a symbol of strength and stability in the government’s credit.

More about money in the US:

  • The $1 US Dollar (USD) bill lasts an average of just one year and 10 months in circulation. The $100 USD bill lasts about seven years and five months.
  • Martha Washington is the only female to have her portrait appear on US currency. The wife of first US President George Washington appeared on the $1 USD Silver Certificates of 1886, 1891 and 1896.
  • It would take about $2.5 million USD worth of pennies laid next to each other to reach across the width of the United States.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By anon355456 — On Nov 16, 2013

By anon355455 — On Nov 16, 2013

By fleeto942 — On Nov 15, 2013

I read that the green dollar was introduced during the latter stages of the Civil war, as was the Confederate brownback.

It's ironic that the color green was chosen possibly because that color suggested the "strength" of the U.S. Government. Yet, two years later, we experienced a great economic depression.

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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