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What Is the Driest Place on Earth?

The driest place on Earth is widely considered to be the Dry Valleys, located in southeastern Antarctica. Although the continent is mainly known for being 98% covered by ice, the 1,853-square-mile (4,800-square-kilometer) Dry Valleys receive only about 2 inches (50 mm) of precipitation per year. This is thought to be partly because of mountains in the area that are so high they block out flowing ice. Another reason the Dry Valleys are the driest place on Earth is because of winds known as katabatic winds. These winds are so powerful — reaching 200 miles (322 km) per hour — that they evaporate most of the possible moisture in the area before it can settle.

More about Antarctica:

  • Antarctica’s climate and conditions so closely resemble the planet Mars that scientists study the continent to try to learn more about conditions on Mars.
  • An average of 5,000 scientists reside in Antarctica during its summer months. The number of residents generally drops to about 1,000 in the winter.
  • About 90% of the ice on Earth is located in Antarctica.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By Chmander — On Feb 27, 2014
@RoyalSpyder - Exactly. I think that sometimes, others assume that cold weather won't cause dryness. However, it's quite the opposite. During the holidays, people often get chapped lips and cracked hands, especially if they stay out in the weather too long. The thing is that in the summer, you're never "dry", because you're always sweating. Overall, the best solutions for dryness problems are lotion and chap stick. Make sure to apply them daily.
By RoyalSpyder — On Feb 27, 2014

@Viranty - Not particularly. It's very similar to the case in the winter time where people always get dry skin.

By Viranty — On Feb 26, 2014

Considering how much ice the area has, I'm really surprised that it's considered such a dry place. I don't want to jump to conclusions, but shouldn't ice add moisture to the area?

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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