We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What Are Greek Olives?

Allison Boelcke
By
Updated May 17, 2024
Our promise to you
WiseGeek is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At WiseGeek, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

An olive is a small, pitted fruit with a sour, bitter flavor. It grows on trees and is native to the Mediterranean area, particularly the country of Greece, one of the leading producers of olives. There are a variety of Greek olives that range in color, flavor, and texture; however, they all tend to play a major role in Greek cuisine from being an ingredient in traditional dishes to being used for the production of olive oil.

Greek olives tend to be considered a versatile ingredient in Greece’s cuisine. The fruit is not usually consumed raw directly from the tree. Instead, after being picked from the olive trees, the individuals olives are often soaked in vinegar, salt, or oil, a process referred to as brining, before being packaged in jars or tins with the brining solution. The olives may have small slits cut into them before being added to the brining ingredients in order for the ingredients to fully penetrate and flavor the olives. They may be served by themselves cold or at room temperature as a snack or appetizer, or they may be used as an ingredient in other hot dishes, such as casseroles and savory pies, or as a garnish.

In addition to being used for eating in their original form, Greek olives are also widely used in the production of the world’s supply of olive oil. The oil is extracted from the olives and is a form of monounsaturated fat, which is generally considered to be a healthier option than saturated fats, such as butter or lard. Saturated fats are derived from animal products and are thought to raise levels of cholesterol, which can lead to heart attacks. Olive oil is often used at room temperature, such as for salad dressings or dipping bread, or can be heated to cook food items.

One of the most widely used varieties of Greek olives are green olives, which are harvested and packaged before they are completely ripened. Specific green varieties include gaidoroelia, megara, and conservolea. Black olives are a variety of Greek olives that are ripened on the trees before being picked. Kalamata olives are large and black with a fruitier taste than the more bitter flavor of green olives, and tend to be one of the most widely consumed types throughout the world.

WiseGeek is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By RoyalSpyder — On Mar 05, 2014

Does anyone else love dipping their bread in olive oil? I do this all the time when I go out to Italian restaurants. It makes me wonder why it tastes so good with the bread. Maybe it's because the "flavors" of the bread and oil meld together. However, one thing I've noticed is that it has to be a certain type of bread. Olive oil doesn't taste good with any type.

By Chmander — On Mar 05, 2014

This article has given me some great insight on Greek olives, and how they're prepared. From reading further into the article, and from viewing the unique images, one can easily assume that they're not your "average" olive. After all, they're used to make olive oil, which is quite expensive and is used in many high class dishes. Speaking of which, from reading even further, I guess this explains why olive oil is generally healthier, as the oil from the Greek olives is a form of monounsaturated fat.

By Viranty — On Mar 04, 2014

I've never tried Greek olives. However, they sound delectable, and I'll be on the lookout for them the next time I go food shopping. Who knew that olives came in such variety?

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.