Is There a Connection between Vitamin E and Diabetes?

Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum
Nurse
Nurse

One of the many aspects of dealing with diabetes involves addressing issues that have to do with nutrition. It is not unusual for physician to recommend dietary changes that enable the individual to manage the intake of carbohydrates while also ingesting nutrients that support good health. When it comes to vitamin E and diabetes, there are two differing opinions regarding whether more of this vitamin ingested either through the diet or with the use of supplements will actually aid in managing blood glucose levels.

Proponents of the use of this nutrient believe there is a definite connection between vitamin E and diabetes, usually pointing to the antioxidant properties of the vitamin. This line of thinking goes that since vitamin E can help to reduce the incidence of heart disease, something that diabetics tend to be more susceptible to, that a larger dose of the nutrient every day helps to support blood flow and heart function in a manner that reduces some of the effects of diabetes, especially nerve damage in the extremities. This would mean that by supporting the heart, blood flow is enhanced and nerve endings are less likely to sustain damage and cause tingling or even pain in the feet or hands.

A differing opinion holds that there is no real connection between vitamin E and diabetes, either in terms of direct prevention or management of potential symptoms. While medical experts acknowledge that including vitamin E in the diet does help to support overall health, there are currently no controlled tests that have proven diabetics receive any special benefits from taking supplements of this type. In addition, taking excessive amounts could cause a number of health issues that in turn reduce the ability of the body to deal with higher blood sugar levels, a situation that would open the door to expediting the development of a number of additional symptoms.

While the debate over the relationship between vitamin E and diabetes continues, there is no doubt that controlled amounts of the nutrient are good for just about everyone, even people who do not suffer with diabetes. As with any type of nutritional supplement, it is important to talk with a physician before choosing to take larger doses of the vitamin. Since the vitamin is fat soluble and can be stored in limited amounts in the liver, there is some potential of negative interaction with prescription drugs and even other nutritional supplements. This means that diabetics who are already at risk for liver damage must be especially diligent about understanding the current findings regarding vitamin E and diabetes, and working with a physician to identify which if any supplements can be safely used with current medications.

Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum

After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including , and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers. Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling.

Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum

After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including , and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers. Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling.

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    • Nurse
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