We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

Is the “Gloomy Octopus” a Social Creature?

Marine biologists had always thought that gloomy octopuses were loners, living solitary lives in the subtropical waters near Australia and New Zealand and being sociable only during mating season. But new research about this cephalopod species -- more formally known as Octopus tetricus, or the common Sydney octopus -- turned up a group of 15 gloomy octopuses living together off the coast of eastern Australia at a site dubbed “Octlantis,” where they exhibited complex social behaviors. Perhaps reminiscent of life in any big city, the researchers documented a lot of aggression among the residents, with males spending much of their time fighting about who was going to live in which den.

Brothers in arms:

  • The "Octlantis" find was only the second example of these octopuses living in groups. Researchers found a similar gloomy octopus city in 2009 built around a large discarded piece of now-heavily encrusted metal; they called it "Octopolis."
  • The study by an international team of marine biologists appeared in the journal Marine and Freshwater Behavior and Physiology.
  • Like other cephalopods, the gloomy octopus is thought to be fairly intelligent. A 2010 study found that the creatures appear to have different personalities, much like humans.
Discussion Comments
By anon1000285 — On Aug 08, 2018

Love the intelligence part, sad about the aggression part.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.