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Is Crying the Same in Every Culture?

Culture has some effect on crying over time. At the time of birth and for a period of time afterward, all babies cry the same. As the babies begin to grow and become more aware of their surroundings, however, the tenor and melody of their crying begins to take on aspects that are relevant to their culture. Along with affecting the melody of the crying, culture also begins to influence how often a child cries based on the expectations and standards of that culture.

More facts about crying:

  • In western culture, women are more likely than men to cry in public. Men are less likely to cry in general during the early years of adulthood, but by the time they reach the age of 50, they tend to cry with greater ease.

  • In a sense, all people are constantly crying. The lacrimal glands exude a combination of water, mucus and oil that is essential for healthy eyes. These types of tears help to clear debris from the surface of the eyes and help filter light for better vision.

  • Having a good cry really can make people feel better. Crying provides release from stress and emotions that might have been restrained for a period of time. The release brought about by crying can aid in healing and help restore some degree of emotional balance.

Malcolm Tatum
By Malcolm Tatum , Writer
Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing to become a full-time freelance writer. He has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including WiseGeek, and his work has also been featured in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and newspapers. When not writing, Malcolm enjoys collecting vinyl records, following minor league baseball, and cycling.

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Malcolm Tatum

Malcolm Tatum

Writer

Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing...
Learn more
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