We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

How do I Stop Teeth Grinding While Sleeping?

Dan Cavallari
By
Updated May 17, 2024
Our promise to you
WiseGeek is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At WiseGeek, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Almost as common as snoring, teeth grinding while sleeping — also known as bruxism — can damage teeth and cause pain in the jaw and head. It is often caused by stress, but it can also be the result of abnormal growth of teeth or alignment issues within the mouth and jaw. The first step in stopping teeth grinding while sleeping is to visit your dentist so he or she can determine the cause of the grinding. From there, the dentist may prescribe a mouth guard to train the jaw to stop clenching, or he or she may refer you to a psychiatrist or other mental health professional to help relieve the stress that is causing the grinding.

In many cases, teeth grinding while sleeping can be stopped by using a mouth guard at night. A dentist can make a mold of your teeth to create a mouth guard for use during the night; this mouth guard will keep teeth from grinding against each other, but it will also train the jaw to rest in a different position. Since teeth grinding while sleeping can lead to permanent injury to the teeth and gums, a mouth guard is necessary to prevent cracked teeth, worn enamel, and jaw pain. A specially designed mouth guard from your dentist may be expensive, however, as they are usually not covered by insurance. If you fit this category, then consider purchasing an athletic mouth guard available at most sporting goods stores. While not as durable or low-profile as the versions used by dentists, it is an inexpensive alternative that can accomplish the same goal.

Sometimes the only way to stop teeth grinding while sleeping is to address the cause, which is very often high levels of stress in one's life. Elevated stress levels can disrupt your normal sleeping patterns, and while the brain is thinking about stressful events that happened during the day, the jaw tends to clamp down, leading to teeth grinding while sleeping. Doctors may recommend you visit a mental health professional who can help you work through some of the stresses of daily life, thereby allowing your mind to relax enough at night that bruxism will not occur. Anger, fear, anxiety, or even anticipation of a positive event to come can all lead to bruxism.

In children, abnormal growth of the teeth and jaws can lead to bruxism. The teeth may not align correctly, leading the child to bite down in such a way that the teeth grind against each other. This is usually not too serious of an issue, as children will outgrow their teeth as they age. If the problem persists after adult teeth begin to grow, a visit to a dentist is in order.

WiseGeek is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Dan Cavallari
By Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By Animandel — On Mar 06, 2014

In addition to damaging teeth, continual grinding of the teeth in sleep situations can lead to disorders with the jaw. The term TMD is used to denote these disorders, which can lead to discomfort when a person talks, yawns or chews. Often times, a loud click or pop is associated with TMD.

TMD is sometimes called TMJ because the temporomandibular joint is involved in these disorders. These are the joints that help the jaw to move without disturbance. If you want to keep the terms straight, it helps to remember that the D in TMD stands for disorder and the J in TMJ stands for joint.

By Sporkasia — On Mar 06, 2014

During a particularly stressful period in her life, my mother began grinding her teeth while sleeping. This teeth grinding in her sleep continued long enough to create some significant dental problems. Eventually, she wore a night guard that protected her teeth and prevented any further dental issues.

At some point, she stopped wearing the guard because she was no longer grinding her teeth. That's why she assumes the condition was stress related.

Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.