How do I Start a Pilates Group? (with picture)

Diane Goettel
Diane Goettel
A woman doing pilates.
A woman doing pilates.

In recent years, Pilates has become a popular exercise system. If you are interested in starting a Pilates group, you will need at least three things. Those three things include a dedicated group who will come to all or most of the sessions, a space to hold the sessions, and a certified group leader. As with all types of exercise techniques, it is important to work with a certified professional to guide you through the movements. Not only will this lead to more effective training, but it will also help to avoid injury.

If you have a large enough space in your home, you may be able to hold the sessions there. A large living room or den with coffee tables and other small pieces of furniture pushed to the edges of the space might be sufficient. If more than one person in your group has a large enough space at home to use as an exercise area, then you could have different members host the Pilates group according to a rotating schedule.

If the others in your group happen to be co-workers, perhaps you can get your company to let you use a cleared conference room once a week. This can actually be a good way to boost company morale and double as a team-building program. If none of these are options, then you may want to look into finding a Pilates teacher who gives lessons out of his or her home.

Before beginning your Pilates group, you will have to work out a payment system for the teacher. Discuss the cost with the teacher and then figure out how that cost should be split up by the group. You may want to even consider having group members pay on a monthly or quarterly basis instead of on a weekly basis. It is important to develop a clear system early on.

Starting a Pilates group with friends is a great way to have fun and get fit together. In order to keep one person in the group from being overloaded with the management of the group, you may want to consider rotating tasks. Key tasks include setting up times for the sessions and collecting the money to pay the instructor. If your Pilates group meets in different places, someone will also have to be responsible for making sure that the space is available at the times of the sessions. Rotating these tasks a few times a year might help to keep one person from being bogged down by too much administrative work.

Diane Goettel
Diane Goettel

In addition to her work as a freelance writer for , Diane is the executive editor of Black Lawrence Press, an independent publishing company based in upstate New York. She has also edited several anthologies, the e-newsletter Sapling, and The Adirondack Review. Diane has a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and an M.A. from Brooklyn College.

Diane Goettel
Diane Goettel

In addition to her work as a freelance writer for , Diane is the executive editor of Black Lawrence Press, an independent publishing company based in upstate New York. She has also edited several anthologies, the e-newsletter Sapling, and The Adirondack Review. Diane has a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and an M.A. from Brooklyn College.

You might also Like

Readers Also Love

Discuss this Article

Post your comments
Login:
Forgot password?
Register:
    • A woman doing pilates.
      A woman doing pilates.