We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

How do I Choose the Best Shin Splint Compression Sleeve?

Dan Cavallari
By
Updated May 17, 2024
Our promise to you
WiseGeek is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At WiseGeek, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Shin splints can be caused by a variety of conditions, and they usually occur in active people — especially runners or people who participate in running sports. One way to help alleviate some of the pain from shin splints and prevent them from occurring in the future is to buy a compression sleeve, which is a tight-fitting fabric that fits snugly around the lower legs. When choosing a shin splint compression sleeve, it is important to consider the size of the sleeve, the cost, and the materials from which the sleeve is made.

One material that is commonly used for these sleeves is neoprene, which fits very tightly and performs the function of the sleeve well. This material does not breathe especially well, however, which means the leg may begin to sweat profusely, leading to discomfort, overheating, or even a lowering of body temperature. Other, thinner synthetic materials such as Lycra® can be used instead to provide the same support without sacrificing breathability, which means that the garment is capable of transferring moisture away from the skin to keep the skin dry.

When choosing a shin splint compression sleeve, be sure to test whether the sleeve can be worn underneath socks and shoes. Some are bulky enough to interfere with other clothing, while others are thin and will not interfere. Choose the most comfortable sleeve that will not bunch up or cause discomfort when worn. Try to also choose one that is adjustable: many sleeves feature hook and loop fasteners to allow the user to tighten or loosen the sleeve as necessary. It also makes adjustments during athletic activities much simpler.

The sleeve needs to fit very tightly in order to be effective, but if it is too tight, it may restrict blood flow. The sleeve is designed to support the muscles in the leg and prevent injury or strain, and it should also stimulate blood flow, thereby delivering more oxygen to the muscles. It can help reduce or prevent swelling and fluid build-up in the lower legs, which may lead to shin splints. Choosing a sleeve that fits tightly is important, but remember that when you put the sleeve on, the seams may split from the pressure. An adjustable sleeve will prevent this by allowing you to put the sleeve on and then tighten it, rather than trying to shove your foot through the small, tight sleeve with no adjustment.

WiseGeek is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Dan Cavallari
By Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By pleonasm — On Apr 29, 2013

@Fa5t3r - Go to a doctor or a personal trainer or someone like that, sure, but make sure you take what they say with a grain of salt. Exercise science and best practices change all the time and there's no telling whether even a doctor actually knows what they are talking about.

I would read a whole bunch of shin splint compression sleeve reviews and, if possible, try a range of them to see how it goes and if it works, then that's fantastic and if it doesn't, oh well at least you tried.

By Fa5t3r — On Apr 28, 2013

@clintflint - That's just in your experience though. What I know is that it's very difficult for anyone to really change their technique when running, particularly if they aren't running professionally. People just run the way they run.

And if compression sleeves for running will help them to run pain-free then I say they should go for it.

I do think that it's the kind of thing you want to run by a fitness expert or a doctor first, just to make sure though. You don't want to accidentally make the problem worse.

By clintflint — On Apr 27, 2013

I'm not a huge fan of this kind of thing. I think most of the time shin splits are caused by bad shoes, bad technique or weak muscles and you should treat the cause, not the symptoms.

Bad shoes always tend to do it for me. In fact I can tell when a shoe is starting to wear out, because I'll start getting pain in the shins again. You have to go and get a diagnosis at a reputable shoe store, so that you know how your foot works. I over-pronate, and I suspect that's what causes the shin splits, because whenever I had shoes that correct it, they go away.

Weak muscles and bad techniques can be fixed by doing some research and being vigilant, although I do think that it's got more to do with the shoes than anything.

Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.