We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

How Do Geckos Climb Walls?

Geckos climb walls with sticky hairs on their toes known as seta. The hairs on the small lizards’ toes have a mechanism that can turn the stickiness factor on and off at will, which allows geckos to first grip and then quickly scale walls. Geckos use their seta as a means of hiding and running away from predators. They can travel at approximately 20 body-lengths every second by scaling surfaces. In addition to giving geckos speed, their toes’ adhesive system is strong—it is estimated that when geckos hang upside down, their seta would be able to support 50 times their weight.

More about geckos:

  • The name gecko is from the Indonesian language Malay and is based on the sound geckos use to communicate with one another.
  • Geckos don’t have eyelids and use their tongues to keep their eyes clean.
  • A common defense mechanism for geckos is to shed their tails in order to distract predators and escape. Some species of gecko are actually able to grow a replacement tail made of cartilage but no bone.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.