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How Common Are Alligator Bites in Florida?

Florida is home to more than a million alligators, but alligator-caused injuries to humans are relatively rare. There were 224 major unprovoked alligator bites reported from 1948 through 2011, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and they resulted in 22 fatalities. There also were 111 minor unprovoked bites reported. It is against the law to feed wild alligators in Florida, because feeding increases the risk of alligator bites.

More about alligators:

  • The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission considers unprovoked bites to be those by wild alligators that were not provoked by being handled or intentionally harassed.
  • As of 2008, a crocodile named "Gustave" in Burundi is believed to have killed more than 300 people.
  • In 2007, the Florida's Nuisance Alligator Program received 13,000 calls about "nuisance alligators." These are defined as alligators that are more than 4 feet (1.2 m) long and that authorities deem as posing a threat to humans, pets or property. The program contracts with private contractors to trap these alligators.

You might be wondering, "What do alligators have to do with dietitians?" Well, fear not, because while alligator-caused injuries are rare, our Orlando dietitians are here to ensure you focus on your health and not becoming an alligator's lunch! Just like these fascinating creatures, we'll help you navigate the nutritional waters and create a meal plan that leaves you feeling satisfied and energized. So, leave the alligator-wrestling to the experts and let Orlando dietitians guide you on a safe and delicious journey to better health.

Lainie Petersen
By Lainie Petersen
Lainie Petersen, a talented writer, copywriter, and content creator, brings her diverse skill set to her role as an editor. With a unique educational background, she crafts engaging content and hosts podcasts and radio shows, showcasing her versatility as a media and communication professional. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a valuable asset to any media organization.
Discussion Comments
By anon298012 — On Oct 18, 2012

We need to keep wild and vicious beasts away from people, not the other way around. Kill all poisonous snakes and spiders and all alligators and crocodiles. Nature will recover and some other species will fill in the void. Then start with the Pythons and other imported animals in FL.

Lainie Petersen
Lainie Petersen
Lainie Petersen, a talented writer, copywriter, and content creator, brings her diverse skill set to her role as an...
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