We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

Does Weather Affect Conflict?

Hot weather might correspond with a higher likelihood of conflict, including personal violence, war and even breakdowns in civilization. Research has found that when temperatures increased by 5° Fahrenheit (about 3° Celsius) over the course of a month, interpersonal violence, such as homicide, increased by 4%, and intergroup violence, such as war, increased by 14%. It is not known why this link between weather and conflict occurs, but researchers believe that heat makes people more hostile. Another possible reason is an increase in migration during hot temperatures, which can lead to more intergroup violence.

More about weather:

  • Humidity has been found to be the weather component that most affects mood, and high humidity typically contributes to fatigue and difficulty concentrating.
  • Scientists predict that the overall global temperature will increase by almost 4° Fahrenheit (2° Celsius) by 2050, which might also lead to an increase in conflict.
  • Bad weather might make people more productive. One study found that men worked 30 minutes longer on rainy days than on clear days.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By anon354218 — On Nov 06, 2013

And there is a lot more boozing.

By Flywheel1 — On Nov 06, 2013

Or how about a third, and simpler, reason: Hot weather brings more people outdoors, and therefore in more contact with other people.

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.