We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

Are Day and Night Each Exactly 12 Hours Long on the Spring Equinox?

It is a common misconception that the day and night are each exactly 12 hours long on the spring equinox — the day when the center of the sun crosses over the Earth's equator, which is typically about 20 March. On the spring equinox, also known as the vernal equinox, there is slightly more daylight than darkness. It is actually two to three days before the equinox when the days are nearly equal parts day and night. For example, three days before the equinox, there is about one more minute of darkness, but on the day of the event itself, there might be about eight more minutes of daylight.

More about the spring equinox:

  • The spring equinox and the fall equinox, or autumnal equinox, are the only days of the year when the sun rises from due east and sets at due west.
  • Before 1582, the design of the commonly used Julian calendar caused the spring equinox to fall one day earlier every 128 years — which eventually would have made it happen during the winter. Pope Gregory XIII altered the calendar slightly in 1582 to prevent this occurrence, which is why the commonly used calendar is now known as the Gregorian calendar.
  • The vernal equinox begins six months of uninterrupted daylight for the North Pole and six months of darkness for the South Pole.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

WiseGeek, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.