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Are Any Animals Born Pregnant?

The aphid, a type of insect that lives off the sap of plants, is born pregnant. Aphids reproduce parthenogenetically, meaning that there is no need for sexual contact. Instead, aphids are born with viable eggs in their bodies, and they give birth to live nymphs. Aphids typically start giving birth after having lived 10-14 days.

More about unusual reproduction:

  • There is evidence that naked mole rats produce male or female sperm in response to a colony's need for one sex over the other.

  • Unlike most other animals, male seahorses become pregnant. They carry their fetuses in brooding pouches.

  • Fetus in fetu is a condition in which an animal, human or non-human, absorbs the body of a twin while still in the mother's uterus. These cases are very rare, although one is occasionally discovered when a person has surgery to remove a lump or tumor and doctors realize that the mass is actually an undeveloped fetus.

Lainie Petersen
By Lainie Petersen
Lainie Petersen, a talented writer, copywriter, and content creator, brings her diverse skill set to her role as an editor. With a unique educational background, she crafts engaging content and hosts podcasts and radio shows, showcasing her versatility as a media and communication professional. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a valuable asset to any media organization.
Discussion Comments
By anon350072 — On Oct 01, 2013

@Gurenda: I'm not certain, but given the fast generational turnover cycle of insects I'd be willing to bet that moths, etc., could have developed their taste for our clothes and attraction to artificial light in a relatively short time.

By Gurenda — On Jan 12, 2013

Only remotely related to the article perhaps, but a matter of interest: certain insects are attracted to sources of light other than the natural kind; typically their larvae feed on man-made fiber such as clothing. Where were they, respectively what method did they use to get their food for survival before mankind showed up on earth and invented candle light and began to weave cloth? If mole rats adjust their sperm production in order to proliferate, did moths go through some kind of metamorphosis to adapt their food supply or did they simply not exist?

Lainie Petersen
Lainie Petersen
Lainie Petersen, a talented writer, copywriter, and content creator, brings her diverse skill set to her role as an...
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