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What is Azor&Reg;?

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  • Written By: Ann Olson
  • Edited By: Jenn Walker
  • Last Modified Date: 14 February 2019
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2019
    Conjecture Corporation
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Azor® is a prescription drug used to decrease a person's blood pressure. It is commonly prescribed to people diagnosed with hypertension, better known as high blood pressure. It contains a calcium channel blocker and an angiotensin II receptor blocker, which are both used to relax the blood vessels and allow the blood to flow more easily, reducing pressure. It is taken by mouth once daily, with or without food.

The two main ingredients in Azor® are used to reduce blood pressure—amlodipine and olmesartan. Amlodipine is a calcium channel blocker that works by slowing the speed at which calcium moves into the heart and blood vessel walls. This causes the blood vessels to relax, making it easier for blood to pass, lowering blood pressure.

Olmesartan is a angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) that works by blocking the angiotensin II receptors. These receptors can cause the blood vessels to narrow, which can make it harder for blood to pass. Olmesartan helps prevent the narrowing of blood vessels, improving blood flow.

Used as prescribed, Azor® has been shown to lower blood pressure within two weeks after patients received the maximum dose. People who cannot control their high blood pressure adequately with amlodipine alone are the most likely candidates for this drug. People who have not seen any results from taking amlodipine and olmesartan medoxomil are also likely candidates.

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Azor® is not safe for everyone. Women who are pregnant, plan to become pregnant or who are breastfeeding are advised not to take this drug. People with a history of heart failure, severe obstructive coronary artery disease or other health conditions may need to take lower doses of this drug or use another drug, as it can worsen heart problems. It can also affect renal function, making it possibly unsafe for people with impaired renal function.

The most common side effect reported was edema, or an unusual accumulation of fluid underneath the skin in one or more areas of the body. Though studies showed this side effect to be rare. Other side effects reported include itching, heart palpitations, frequent or excessive urination, rash and a sudden drop in blood pressure after standing up quickly.

Some people could accidentally overdose on Azor® if not taken as prescribed. Symptoms of an overdose include low blood pressure and an abnormally fast or slow heart rate. People who suspect an overdose should seek medical attention immediately.

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