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What is a Stabilization Policy?

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  • Written By: Malcolm Tatum
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 04 December 2016
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2016
    Conjecture Corporation
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A stabilization policy is a defined strategy that is used to correct any factors that have threatened to undermine the financial well-being of a business or the economy of a local area, nation, or even a larger region of the world. In each instance, the purpose of the policy is to identify the reasons for the instability and formulate a strategy that will begin to reverse the ill effects of those underlying causes. Often, a stabilization policy may require an extended period of time to completely accomplish its goal, ranging anywhere from a few months to several years.

In terms of the financial stability of an individual business, a stabilization policy may involve such strategies as minimizing various types of expenses, or making changes to a product line to filter out products that are no longer desirable. At the same time, the policy may also look toward developing new production processes that will aid in making the business profitable once more. Typically, the stabilization policy will identify specific events that must take place, along with identifying the actions that will put in motion the plan that ultimately will reverse the recent financial misfortune.

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With nations, a stabilization policy comes into play when the economy goes through some type of negative shift, threatening the economic welfare of the citizens of that country as well as the country itself. Policies of this type are developed to deal with periods of deep recession, runaway inflation, or a period of economic depression. It is not unusual for a nation to make use of a central bank to begin implementing steps to ease the economic hardship, or even to lend funds to businesses in an attempt to curb unemployment and promote spending as a way of moving the nation out of the current financial crisis.

There is no single stabilization policy that is ideal for every situation. This means that businesses and governments must always tailor the policy to address the current set of factors that threaten to or have already destabilized all or a portion of an economy. When a national government engages in this type of strategy, there is often a governmental oversight panel that manages the tasks required, monitors progress, and aids in adapting the plan to new circumstance that arise during the recovery period. The length of time it takes to begin seeing results from a stabilization policy will vary, depending on the nature and severity of the economic crisis.

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