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How Do I Choose the Best Vintage Hutch?

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  • Written By: Dan Cavallari
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 27 September 2018
  • Copyright Protected:
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The term "vintage" generally denotes an object that is aged and antique, so a vintage hutch is either likely to be an antique itself, or built in such a style that it appears to be old and antique. Choosing the best vintage hutch for you starts with determining whether you want a true antique piece, or if you would rather save some money and buy a replica. Each course of action has its own advantages and disadvantages, and you may be able to figure out which hutch is best for you based on your purchase budget.

Be sure to do a bit of research into the various types of hutches, and have a firm idea in mind as to how you intend to use the vintage hutch once you purchase it. If you choose a true antique, remember that the hutch may be weakened from aging and may not be the most stable unit. You may need to invest some time and money into stabilizing or otherwise refurbishing the unit before using it. Be sure to include such costs and time investments into your budget before purchasing the vintage hutch so you can be prepared for the overall cost. It is a good idea to measure the space in which you intend to put the hutch as well. This will give you a good idea as to what size hutch will be most appropriate for your space.

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Many hutches will feature glass doors that will allow you to display china or other attractive pieces. The glass allows the pieces to be seen while still offering some protection from potential impact. If you are buying a vintage hutch that is a true antique, be sure to examine the glass carefully to ensure it is clear and clean. Otherwise, foggy glass might not show off the contents of the hutch very well, and replacing the glass might be necessary.

The materials used to make a vintage hutch can vary considerably, so it is best to educate yourself about the various options. Hardwoods are most common on antiques; oak, mahogany, cherry, and various other woods are durable, resistant to rotting and water damage, and exceptionally beautiful. Softwoods are more susceptible to damage such as rotting, warping, splitting, or cracking, and antiques made from such woods are likely to have some sort of damage that will need to be repaired or otherwise tended to.

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